The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, New York City, is one of the largest museums in the world. Located in Theodore Roosevelt Park across the street from Central Park, the museum complex comprises 28 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library. The museum collections contain over 33 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies more than 2,000,000 square feet (190,000 m2). The museum has a full-time scientific staff of 225, sponsors over 120 special field expeditions each year, and averages about five million visits annually.

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American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
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  • Museum curator Joel Cracraft presents evidence that the sixth extinction is here. Join him as he explores how the earth has changed dramatically in recent decades, and where its fate might be heading if we continue on our current path. This SciCafe took place at the Museum on December 6th, 2017. To listen to the full lecture, including Q&A, download the podcast on our blog: https://www.amnh.org/...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
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  • The sky is awash in light, but there’s much more beyond the visible that we cannot sense with our eyes. What do we see when we use telescopes to peer into the invisible? #astronomy #space #visiblelight #wavelength #infrared #MilkyWay #Andromeda #stars #CMB #microwave #UV #gammaray #pulsars #blackholes #galaxies #telescopes © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • We don’t always think of balance as one of our senses, but scientists often consider it as essential as sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. For a species like the three-toed sloth, however, there’s little need for this sixth sense. Check out the Museum’s blog for more info: https://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/news-posts/sluggish-sloths-have-little-use-for-balance OUR SENSES, a new ex...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
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  • Who can look out into space and not ask the age-old question: Are we alone in the universe? Astronomers have already identified dozens of planets beyond the edges of our solar system which could be like our own Earth. Join astrophysicist Lisa Kaltenegger, who is the director of the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University, as she explains the different methods astronomers use to detect exoplan...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Touch is perhaps the most primordial sense – even some single-celled organisms are able to sense pressure. Humans have many different types of touch receptors, including one that can also be found at the base of cat and mouse whiskers. OUR SENSES, a new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History, delves into how our brains, adapted over millennia to help our ancestors survive their env...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Anyone who has ever surprised a black bear in their own backyard is already keenly aware of the overlap between human communities and bear habitats. Rae Wynn-Grant, a conservation biologist at the Museum, offered insights into black bear behavior and what humans can do to improve relations with this wide-ranging and adaptable species at a recent SciCafe program, which took place at the Museum on O...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • A 12-foot-tall, sparkling amethyst geode from Uruguay—one of the world’s largest—was unveiled on October 16, 2017, at the American Museum of Natural History. It will remain on view in the Grand Gallery through the 2017 Holiday season. Learn more about how this magnificent specimen was formed here: https://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent-exhibitions/grand-gallery/amethyst-geode #Geode #Amethyst...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • This new exhibition delves into how our brains, adapted over millennia to help our ancestors survive their environments, work with sensory organs to shape and reframe our perceptions of everyday encounters. #senses #brain #science #sight #sound #touch #taste #smell #balance #museum OUR SENSES will be open to the public from Monday, November 20, 2017, to Sunday, January 6, 2019. Members will be a...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
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  • Saturn’s rings are captivating from any vantage point, but more so when tilted fully towards or away from Earth, as they are this October. Our understanding of Saturn, its rings, and its moons has been enriched over the past 13 years through the Cassini mission, which ended in September. For a transcript of this video, visit: https://www.amnh.org/our-research/hayden-planetarium/blog/saturn-shows-...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • See over 500 free-flying tropical butterflies from all corners of the globe at The American Museum of Natural History's Butterfly Conservatory. Learn more about the life-cycle and ecological importance of these beautiful fliers from October 7, 2017 through May 28, 2018. *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: ...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
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  • Butterflies aren't born as we recognize them–they go through a process called metamorphosis to change from a caterpillar to a chrysalis to an adult butterfly. See live butterflies, moths, and chrysalises at the American Museum of Natural History's Butterfly Conservatory, opening October 7, 2017. Generous support for The Butterfly Conservatory has been provided by the Eileen P. Bernard Exhibiti...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • More than 4,000 dry coral specimens are housed in the collections of the American Museum of Natural History, including specimens that date back to the 1870s! This collection is not only beautiful but essential for scientists studying our oceans because it lets them peer back in time. Dive in with the dry coral collections team to learn how corals grow, how the Museum takes care of these storied sp...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Archive excerpt from 1927 shows New York school children visiting the American Museum of Natural History, and includes street scenes of the city. The film also shows the circulating nature study collection, which brought Museum material to children in different neighborhoods. #education #archive #NewYorkCity #1920s Preservation of this film funded by the National Film Preservation Foundation. A...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • You may know the American Museum of Natural History’s exhibits, but only a tiny portion of our world-class collection is on view. Go behind the scenes in 360 with Sir David Attenborough as he explains how museum collections help us learn more about—and protect-- the natural world. For a visual cue transcript, visit: https://www.amnh.org/explore/amnh.tv/(watch)/behind-the-scenes/sir-david-attenbor...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Archival Museum footage shows the discovery of the "perfect dozen" nest of dinosaur eggs found during Roy Chapman Andrews's expeditions to the Gobi Desert in the 1920s. Excerpts from the Central Asiatic Expeditions, filmed during the American Museum of Natural History's Third Asiatic Expedition to China and Mongolia, 1921-1930. The film records some of the paleontological finds of the expedition...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Activate connection at the 2017 Margaret Mead Film Festival. More than 30 ground-breaking, international, nonfiction films and media present fresh cross-cultural perspectives. Honoring legendary anthropologist Margaret Mead, the festival reinforces our search for deeper understanding of the limitless diversity and complex texture that is human experience. Come for the long weekend of film screenin...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Archival Museum film includes some of the earliest color footage of a total solar eclipse, filmed during a 1937 expedition to Peru. Excerpts from the Hayden Planetarium-Grace Peruvian Eclipse Expedition of 1937. George Clyde Fisher, curator of astronomy at the AMNH-Hayden Planetarium, led the expedition. The film opens with a train traveling up the Peruvian Andes toward the summit camp. At Cerro ...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • On August 21, 2017, the long-anticipated total solar eclipse will darken the skies from Oregon to South Carolina as the Moon passes between the Earth and Sun. The last time the contiguous United States saw a total solar eclipse was in 1979, and the next one won’t be until 2024. Learn more about the science and significance of this phenomenon and the best way to view it—whether you’re in the “path...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • A total solar eclipse is a singularly magnificent phenomenon. The Great American Eclipse on August 21, 2017, will be visible as either a partial or a total eclipse throughout North America. See how it appears from various vantage points on Earth, and watch from space as the shadow sweeps across the continent. For a visual cue transcript, visit: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/hayden-planetarium/...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Vladimir Nabokov is best known for his literary masterpiece Lolita, but next to writing, his great passion was the study of moths and butterflies. Curatorial Assistant Suzanne Rab Green tells the story of the author’s first road trip across the U.S., where he drew inspiration and collected specimens along the way. For a timeline of Nabokov’s 1941 trip, including butterflies and vintage postcards ...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • Stars aren’t still--they move through space. Our Sun and the seven stars that form the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major all orbit the center of the Milky Way at different speeds. So why do today’s constellations closely resemble those depicted by ancient astronomers? Find out why they, like us, saw just a snapshot of cosmic time. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY #sta...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • During a year in the Museum’s Science Research Mentoring Program, two high school students discover more than just new lab skills: they discover a new species of anemone. See how Elena and Sebastian’s project analyzing some of the invertebrate collections at the American Museum of Natural History taught them how to be scientists and helped contribute to a scientific discovery. For a visual cue tr...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • How do spiders make their webs? Turns out it’s in their DNA. Spider expert and Museum curator Cheryl Y. Hayashi discusses her research into spider silk, why it’s an exciting time to be a biologist, and why natural history museums are so important to the future of science. Read a Q&A with Dr. Hayashi: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/news-posts/the-amazing-spider-curator *** Subscribe to o...

American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
YouTube Video
  • How do spiders make their webs? Turns out it’s in their DNA. Spider expert and Museum curator Cheryl Y. Hayashi discusses her research into spider silk, why it’s an exciting time to be a biologist, and why natural history museums are so important to the future of science. Read a Q&A with Dr. Hayashi: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/news-posts/the-amazing-spider-curator *** Subscribe to our...

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