Ashridge Trees Limited

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Type: Blog Article

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  • Winter 2016 Photo Competition

    Our Winter 2016 photo competition is now open for entries! Enter today for a chance to win £100 in Ashridge Nurseries Gift vouchers! Fancy bagging yourself £100 in vouchers to spend with us? Well you're in luck as we are giving away £200 in vouchers, £100 to one lucky winner each week up until Christmas! The competition is simple. All you have to do is take a picture of your beautifully decorate...

  • December deadlines

    We put wrapping up presents pretty far down the list of essential things to do in December, or at least in daylight hours. It is far more important to keep staggering into the garden and the December focus might well be on fruit trees, and by this we mean fruits without stones and so that mainly means pears and apples. By now their branches should be well and truly bare leaving you able to assess ...

  • Cotton on to Cotoneasters

    Another plant that sings for its supper and is also looking good at this time of year are the Cotoneasters. They are a varied bunch, some growing as ground cover, some growing into standard trees but all of them are members of the rose family, all are tough (they are allied to hawthorns and pyracanthas), hardy (many call Siberia or the Himalayas home) and ascetic (unfazed by any soil type, drought...

  • Looking good now and for all four seasons. Really?

    If you want a wisp of spring to hang onto at this time of year then invest in a winter flowering cherry tree (Prunus x subhirtella 'Autumnalis').  A slip of a thing, this tree is slender and slightly twiggy. Although it can grow up to 7 metres it rarely does and so is suitable for all but the tiniest garden. Crucially its slim build and restrained foliage means that it does not cast heavy shade an...

  • Baying at the moon...

    Leaving the flowery lot to wax poetical about their roses and those super-full moon watchers to their nighttime vigils, the more Vorsprung Durch Technik of you may be pining after structure, clean lines, verticals and such like. The punctuation marks of this particular gardening grammar are shapely or evenly shaped evergreens that do not disappear in winter. Imagine bay pyramids standing sentinel ...

  • David Austin Roses

    On that note, what started as a warm November has meant that my Simply Beautiful rose - a cheeky little Ashridge number for Valentine's day, tragically bought by me… for me - budded up again and despite recent frosts the flowers opened to greet the month. All of this incredible rose fecundity and floriferousness may be partly to do with the weather but is also down to the skill of our rose breeder...

  • Christmas trees - last chance!

    It is the last chance saloon for those in denial about the imminent onset of Christmas. To save on traipsing around, children in tow and ice on the road, the answer to "Where do we get a lovely, non-droppy-needle, symmetrical Christmas tree?", is "Right here!". We have allocated most of our stock already but we always save a few for the more laid back members of the Ashridge community, so order no...

  • All about Eve

    Apart from the lovely Clematis Cirrhosa ‘Freckles’, and Winter Jasmine there are few winter flowers to remind us that there will be an end to chilly temperatures and pitch black by five pm. One shrub does stand out however and that is the lovely Eve Price, a named variety of Viburnum tinus. Viburnums are a backbone plant in any garden being easy to grow, often evergreen or semi-evergreen and all h...

  • A bit of a November nudge

    Governments are fond of using the word 'nudging' in the context of 'nudging' you to do the 'right thing'. In November, clearly the right thing is to persevere outside while the soil is still workable to prepare the ground for your new cutting garden and for your gooseberry plants, whether those are in the main or kitchen garden. Barrow loads of muck are required which will keep you fit and trim an...

  • Roses for the Cutting Garden

    I know that the subject of roses in their hedging and hip form came up in the last newsletter but arguably (and I may be on sticky ground here) every garden should have a rose or two in one of its incarnations. Even for those with a more modernist or Italianate approach to gardening, a little light relief is always necessary and a rose provides just that. As we have mentioned, it is bareroot seaso...

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