Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By: Liz Clift Not too long ago, sand cat kittens were filmed for the first time, and the internet went gaga over the brief video—especially the portion of the internet that’s convinced the internet is for cats. So, I pose this question to you: what could be better than cats wearing snowshoes? Yes, these exist. […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Kay Wiseman When was the last time you observed a healthy fox in Colorado? I moved from the mid-west to Fort Collins, CO in 2011. I work and play in the outdoors so I tend to take notice when nature seems a bit “off.” No sooner had I settled into my new city that […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift Sea Otter Awareness Week is September 24-30, 2017 This summer, I had the opportunity to watch an otter hunt in the surf off the coast of Olympic National Park, in Washington state. The otter rode the waves in, close to the shoreline, and then swam back out, repeating this routine a couple […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift (with thanks to Joseph Ehrenberger!) If you grew up in one part of the US (many of the eastern states extending into the Great Plains), the calling of the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) was probably a staple of your childhood evenings. If you grew up in other places, perhaps not so much. […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift Visual note-taking, sometimes also called sketchnoting or graphic recording, allows you to represent ideas non-linguistically. And considering that the written word is a relatively modern invention (in particular, it wasn’t until very recently in the history of human beings that the written word was something most of us in the Western world, […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • by Liz Clift Have you seen the photos—and worse, the video!—of the giant mats of floating fire ants (Solenopsis invicta)  in the wake of the flooding in southeast Texas? Yeah, us too, and we’ll admit they’re a bit horrifying. And look, guys. The ants are now just feet from house. pic.twitter.com/rt2aU7Uvm3 — Mike Hixenbaugh (@Mike_Hixenbaugh) […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • There are almost 2,500 species of scorpions in the world, and many differ in the shape and size of their venomous tail. The reasons for this large variation in tail shape are often not known. While scorpions sting their insect prey slowly and precisely, they defend themselves from attackers with a fast and swooping strike of their tail. The defensive strike may therefore be the more demanding beha...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Islands are great natural biological laboratories to investigate how organisms can adapt to different selective pressures. This study by Donihue et al (www.colindonihue.com) takes advantage of the different sizes of islands in the Greek Archipelago to investigate how a common lizard, Podarcis erhardii, differs in body size, head shape, and bite force depending the size of the island The authors...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Anolis lizards are well known for their colorful, expandable throat fan, called the dewlap, which they use to attract mates and repel rivals. The dewlap is a very thin structure and some of the light that strikes its surface shines through it, becoming colored and spreading in all directions as it does. If strongly lit from behind – for example when the sun is on the opposite side of the dewlap f...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • For effective communication, there should be a close match between bird song characteristics and the auditory mechanisms that facilitate signal processing, so birds should be good at hearing the kinds of songs they make. In this study, the authors looked at three species that inhabit forest areas, three species that live in intermediate, scrub-like areas, and three species that live in open areas....

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Stag beetles are renowned for their spectacular male-male battles. In these scuffles, males fight each other with their long jaws over mates or desirable stumps of rotten wood. As a result of this, their jaw is strongly shaped by sexual selection and in some species, can become as long as their own body. How does this effect their ability to run? Intuitively, one would expect that such large stru...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Unlike humans, some animals evolved on a sugar diet equally rich in glucose and fructose. Hovering hummingbirds are rare among vertebrates in their ability to rapidly make use of ingested sugars to fuel energetically expensive hovering flight, powering up to 100% of their metabolic needs with the sugars they drink, while humans athletes max out at around 30%. Until now, we haven't understood to wh...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Animals move within natural habitats in complicated ways, in response to many aspects of the environment. To understand those patterns of movement, we need new methods to gather highly detailed information on exactly where a free-ranging animal spends its time; and new methods of analysis to extract maximum insight from those data. We attached miniature GPS transmitters to large lizards- bluetongu...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Bees and other pollinating insects are declining in many countries. Many people are concerned and want to help reverse this decline, but do not know how. One way that the general public can help is via their gardens, by growing ornamental plants that are also attractive to flower-visiting insects. Although individual gardens are relatively small, collectively they comprise a substantial area. But ...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Forests play the important role of fixing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and storing the carbon as biomass and soil organic matter. In the northern hemisphere, CO2 concentration fluctuates with the seasonality of photosynthesis of plants. Recent global warming has made the arrival of spring earlier, and leaves appear sooner. How does this influence the carbon cycle in forests? In an oak-...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Although climate change is heating polar and temperate areas faster than the tropics, evidence is mounting that tropical ectotherms (animals that don't produce their own heat) will be negatively affected by the relatively mild warming they do experience. Duke researchers tested this idea at a fine scale with the Puerto Rican crested anole, Anolis cristatellus, by combining data on the lizard's cur...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Many bats use echolocation to find insects and other arthropods for food. They emit ultrasonic calls and listen for the returning echoes to detect and localize their snack. In cooperation with Prof. Tigga Kingston from Texas Tech University and Prof. Rosli Hashim from The University of Malaya, Dr. Björn Siemers and Daniela Schmieder from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology plunged deep into t...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • Gabrielle Archard and colleagues describe their study in which they investigated the relationship between hormonal and behavioural stress responsiveness in multiple natural populations of a tropical freshwater poeciliid fish, Panamanian bishop, that experience different levels of predation pressure and hence encounter different rates of stressful events. Archard, G. A., Earley, R. L., Hanninen, A...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • This video is a visual overview of the following scientific publication in Functional Ecology (http://www.functionalecology.org/). Video by: Christine Shepard (http://christineshepard.com/) Contributing photographer & cinematographer: Jim Abernethy (http://www.scuba-adventures.com) Contributing photographer & cinematographer: Austin Gallagher (http://austingallagher.com/) ------------ Don't bit...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • In this video Thornham et al describe a novel form of myrmecotrophic mutualism in which the ants' cleaning behaviour maintains the effectiveness of a pitcher plant's prey capture mechanism. To read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2435.2011.01937.x/abstract To read the journal: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
YouTube Video
  • The foraging tight-rope is a matter of concentration for free-ranging bushbabies as they choose the right plants to eat whilst avoiding their enemies. McArthur and colleagues explain strategies used by bushbabies to keep safe. To read the author lay summary: http://www.functionalecology.org/view/0/summaries.html#foraging To read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2435.2...

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift One of the easiest ways to get water from one place to the next is to let gravity do the work. While on the extreme end, this creates waterfalls, if the change in elevation is more gradual, it can create a meandering waterway. This is also the principle behind high line canals. […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift One of the definitions of ecology is the study of how organisms relate to one another and their environment. Think back to your childhood classrooms when you considered food chains. For the most part, they were structurally pretty simple. Slightly more complex are food webs, which showed interrelated dietary preferences. Animals with […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift What does it mean to have a connected and healthy floodplain? First, let’s start with what floodplain even means. It’s the relatively flat land adjacent to a river or stream that is inundated with water during high flow events, which most of us simply call floods. As a result of this flooding, […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By: Liz Clift This is the time of year when, in the evenings, I can find bees buried into the trumpeted blossoms of Datura sp. These plants are commonly called datura, as well as devil’s trumpets, moonflowers, and jimsonweed (among other names). Datura is part of the nightshade family (Solanaceae) and all species of datura […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift Iowa became part of the heart of American agriculture, due to the rich—and thick—topsoil it contained as white settlers moved across the plains. Iowa’s nutrient-dense is, in part, due to Iowa’s placement between the Missouri and the Mississippi Rivers, which form the majority of the eastern and western borders of the state. […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Liz Clift Editor’s Note: This post provides a hands-on experiment you can do with children to help them understand how erosion and floodplains work to re-distribute nutrients, especially in flood events. You may want to couple this with reading news reports about floods (new or old) for older children, or with a visit to […]

Great Ecology
Great Ecology
Blog Post
  • By Michael Kaminski Last week Great Ecology staff boarded a yacht to attend the 2017 Waterfront Conference along New York City’s Hudson Riverfront. The annual event is hosted by the NYC-based non-profit Waterfront Alliance and features a variety of talks and panel discussions. This year’s topics ranged from how current national politics may impact our […]

Out-Market Your Competitors?

Get complete competitive insights on over 2.2 million companies to drive your marketing strategy.

Create Free Account Log in

By signing up, you agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Out-Market Your Competitors

Get complete competitive insights on over 2.2 million companies to drive your marketing strategy.

Create Free Account

Already a user?  Log in

By signing up, you agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.