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  • A Cold Hard Look at FPGAs
    Researchers at the Delft University of Technology wanted to use FPGAs at cryogenic temperatures down around 4 degrees Kelvin. They knew from previous research that many FPGAs that use submicron fabrication technology actually work pretty well at those temperatures. It is the other components that misbehave — in particular, capacitors and voltage regulators. They worked out an interesting strategy ...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • DIY LiPo Protectors
    Spiderman’s Uncle Ben was known to say, “With great power comes great responsibility.” The same holds true for battery power. [Andreas] wanted to use protected 18650 cells, but didn’t want to buy them off the shelf. He found a forty cent solution. Not only can you see it in the video, below, but he also explains and demonstrates what the circuit is doing and why. Protection is important with LiPo ...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Pulleys within Pulleys form a Unique Transmission for Robots
    After a couple of millennia of fiddling with gears, you’d think there wouldn’t be much new ground to explore in the field of power transmission. And then you see something like an infinitely variable transmission built from nested pulleys, and you realize there’s always room for improvement. The electric motors generally used in robotics can be extremely efficient, often topping 90% efficiency at ...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Reverse Engineering Guitar Hero
    What do you do when a ten-year-old video game has a bug in it? If you are [ExileLord] you fix it, even if you don’t have the source code. Want to know how? Luckily, he produced a video showing all the details of how he tracked the bug down and fixed it. You can see the video below. You may or may not care about Guitar Hero, but the exercise of reverse engineering and patching the game is a great e...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: OrthoSense, a Smart Knee Brace for Physical Therapy
    If you have knee surgery, you can probably count on some physical therapy to go with it. But one thing you might not be able to count on is getting enough attention from your therapist. This was the case with [Vignesh]’s mother, who suffers from osteoarthritis (OA). Her physiotherapist kept a busy schedule and couldn’t see her very often, leaving her to wonder at her rehabilitation progress. [Vign...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Cuban Embassy Attacks and The Microwave Auditory Effect
    If you’ve been paying attention to the news, you may have seen a series of articles coming out about US staffers in Cuba. It seems that 21 staffers have suffered a bizarre array of injuries ranging from hearing loss to dizziness to concussion-like traumatic brain injuries. Some staffers have reported hearing incapacitating sounds in the embassy and in their hotel rooms. The reports range from clic...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Seek Out Scammers With Skimmer Scanner
    Last week we reported on some work that Sparkfun had done in reverse engineering a type of hardware card skimmer found installed in gasoline pumps incorporating card payment hardware. The device in question was a man-in-the-middle attack, a PIC microcontroller programmed to listen to the serial communications between card reader and pump computer, and then store the result in an EEPROM. The device...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • The Electronics Markets of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    When we think about world-famous electronics markets in Asia, usually Shenzhen, Tokyo’s Akihabara, or Shanghai’s Beijing Road come to mind. There’s another market that I’ve had my eye on for a few years: Nhật Tảo market in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. It might not be as large or accessible as the more well-known markets, but it’s very much worth a visit if you’re in the area. I decided it was time t...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • 3D Printing Aluminum with Nanoparticles
    We love our 3D printers. But sometimes we really wish we could print in metal. While metal printing is still out of reach for most of us, HRL Labs announced a powdered aluminum printing process that they claim is a breakthrough because it allows printing (and welding) of high-strength aluminum alloys that previously were unprintable and unweldable. The key is treating the metal with special zircon...
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Push Buttons, Create Music With A MIDI Fighter
    Musicians have an array of electronic tools at their disposal to help make music these days. Some of these are instruments in and of themselves, and [Wai Lun] — inspired by the likes of Choke and Shawn Wasabi — built himself a midi fighter Midi fighters are programmable instruments where each button can be either a note, sound byte, effect, or anything else which can be triggered by a button. [Lun...
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New blog articles detected.

  • A Very 2017 Take On A BBC Micro
    In the early 1980s, there were a plethora of 8-bit microcomputers on the market, and the chances are that if you were interested in such things you belonged to one of the different tribes of enthusiasts for a particular manufacturer’s product. If you are British though there is likely to be one machine that will provide a common frame of reference for owners of all machines of that era: The Acorn ...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Laser Smoothies At Maker Faire
    This year at Maker Faire, laser cutters were all the rage. Dremel announced a 40W laser cutter, but it won’t be available for purchase until this time next year, there is no price yet, and therefore doesn’t deserve further mention. Glowforge was out in full force, but the most interesting aspect of the Glowforge — a compact filter system that sits right underneath the laser — was not to be found. ...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Hackaday Links: September 24, 2017
    This is it. After twelve years we finally have a new Star Trek. Star Trek: Discovery (we’re using ST:DSC as the abbreviation) is airing right about when this post goes up. Next week, you’ll have to pay CBS $6USD a month to get your Star Trek fix, and today might be the last time a new episode of Star Trek is aired on broadcast TV ever. Enjoy it now, and hope the theme song doesn’t have lyrics. Als...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Inexpensive Emergency Button
    I’ve fallen and I can’t get up. We all remember it, and we all know what product we’re talking about. Now, with cheap microcontrollers, ubiquitous WiFi, and wearable electronics, there must be a simpler solution. [Jean Paradedel]’s emergency button project is designed to replace those wearable emergency buttons, which usually include an expensive call center plan. [Jean]’s button is based off an E...
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New blog articles detected.

  • A Thoughtful Variety of Projects and Failures
    Our friends at [The Thought Emporium] have been bringing us delightful projects but not all of them warrant a full-fledged video. What does anyone with a bevy of small but worthy projects do? They put them all together like so many mismatched LEGO blocks. Grab Bag #1 is the start of a semi-monthly video series which presents the smaller projects happening behind the scenes of [The Thought Emporium...
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New blog articles detected.

  • Datalogger uses ESP32 and ESP8266 Low Power Modes
    [G6EJD] wanted to design a low power datalogger and decided to look at the power consumption of an ESP32 versus an ESP8266. You can see the video results below. Of course, anytime someone does a power test, you have to wonder if there were any tricks or changes that would have made a big difference. However, the relative data is interesting (even though you could posit situations where even those ...
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Giant D20 Is A Critical Hit in More Ways than One
    [Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson] is a member of the NYC Resistor hackerspace and an avid fan of a D&D themed improv theatre called The Campaign. To show his appreciation, he decided to gift them a Christmas present: a giant D20. The original plan called for integrated LEDs to burst alight on a critical hit or miss, or let out pulses if it landed on another face. Cool, right? Well, easier said than done....
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Game Boy Advance Hiding In a Medical Device
    It turns out that medical manufacturers also do hacking once in a while. [JanHenrikH] recently tweeted a photo of an ECG-Trigger-Unit that he’d opened up. Inside he found that the LCD screen was that of a Game Boy Advance (GBA) and the reason he could tell was that the screen’s original case was still there, complete with GAME BOY ADVANCE SP written on it. In the manufacturer’s defense, this devic...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Giving a 4k Webcam Special Eyes
    It’s a problem as old as photography: your camera is only as good as your lens. As cameras shrink, so do lenses, and so do the options for upgrading to a better lens. And forget about switching to a different focal length or aperture — it’s often just not an option. Unless you make it an option by adding a CS lens mount to a high-end webcam. We’ll stipulate that at 4k resolution and packed with al...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • EMMC Hacks For The Speed And Capacity Upgrade Win
    You could say that it is the essence of a site like this one, that the kind of people who form our readership are also the kind of people who examine the specs of the devices in front of them to reveal hidden features. Such was the case with [Ryan], who noticed that the eMMC controller on his 96Boards HiKey development board supports both HS200 data transfer speeds and 1.8v signaling, both of whic...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Playing Mario on an Oscilliscope
    Any display can be connected to a microcontroller and used as a display if you know the protocol to use and have enough power in your micro. Sometimes, an odd display is used just “because it’s there.” This seems to be the case for Reddit user [phckopper], who has used a STM32 and a PS2 joystick to play a version of a Mario game on an oscilloscope. There’s not many technical details but [phckopper...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Infrared Vein Illumination
    Phlebotomy is a fun word, and the fine art of finding veins. While the skill of putting needles in arms is honed by nurses and physicians over the course of decades, there are, of course, technological solutions to finding veins. One of the more impressive medical devices that does this uses near-infrared imaging — basically looking under the skin with almost visible light. These devices cost a fo...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • 3D Printing At Maker Faire
    The current trend of cheap, desktop, consumer 3D printers arguably began at the World Maker Faire in New York several years ago. What began with just a single printer exploded into a mindless proliferation of extrusion boxes, and by 2012, every single booth had to have a 3D printer on display no matter how applicable a CNC machine was to what they were actually selling. Now we’re in the doldrums o...
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New blog articles detected.

  • The Tiny, $25 PocketBone
    It was announced a day or two ago, but now the PocketBone has made its first real-world appearance at the World Maker Faire in New York this weekend. This is a tiny, tiny Linux computer that’s small enough to fit on a keychain, or in an Altoids mini tin. It’s only $25 USD, and from the stock lists on Mouser and Digikey, there are plenty to go around. The specs for the PocketBeagle are more or less...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Quick and Dirty Blimp Mount for a Shotgun Mike
    Sometimes you don’t have the hardware you need, and you can either do without or let the project’s needs inspire you to create an alternative. That’s pretty sweet, and it’s even sweeter when you find a solution that’s dirt cheap. [Chu_st] created a sub-$10 blimp mount for his shotgun mike. It consists of a PVC pipe which attaches to the microphone’s shock mount. Plastic gardening grid is used for ...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Building This TARDIS Is Anything But A Snap
    As an avid fan of the show Dr Who, [Adam Sifounakis] saw a model for a laser-cut TARDIS that piqued his curiosity that eventually grew into a multi-week project involving multiple setbacks, missteps, revamps and — finally — gratification. Behold, his sound activated TARDIS. First and foremost, assembling and painting the model was a fun puzzle — despite a few trips to the store — with a little bac...
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Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Scooter Wheels Keep DIY Barn Doors on Track
    [MotoGeeking] built a giant spray booth and is in the process of making customized, air-filtering barn doors for it. When it came to buy hardware to move the doors, though, he found all the ready-made options to be prohibitively expensive. You know what comes next: he designed barn door hardware from the ground up, and did it as cheaply as possible. After intensely studying many images of barn doo...
Hack a Day
Hack a Day
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New blog articles detected.

  • Cheap, Full-Duplex Software Defined Radio With The LimeSDR
    A few years ago, we saw the rise of software-defined radios with the HackRF One and the extraordinarily popular RTL-SDR USB TV tuner dongle. It’s been a few years, and technology is on a never-ending upwards crawl to smaller, cheaper, and more powerful widgets. Now, some of that innovation is making it to the world of software-defined radio. The LimeSDR Mini is out, and it’s the cheapest and most ...

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