The John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) is a school within Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). It offers programs in engineering, applied sciences, and technology. The dean of the school is Francis J. Doyle III.

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Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Science and Cooking for Kids
    Now in its 5th year, the “Science and Cooking for Kids” lab is a hands-on class aimed at piquing kids’ interests in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) through an approachable medium: food. The program is coordinated by the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Harvard Ed Portal.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Engineering a Renaissance
    Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences became a school in 2007. This video marks the important milestone in the history of our school.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • A stem’s ‘sense of self’ contributes to plant shape
    It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems. Read the full story: https://www.seas.harvard.edu...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Buckling induced kirigami
    Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from the ancient Japanese paper craft of kirigami.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Ceramic Foam Print
    Direct foam writing of a hexagonal honeycomb with ceramic foam ink. After the ink solidifies, the resulting structure consists of air surrounded by ceramic on multiple length scales. The porosity of the structure at both micro and macro scales impacts the structure’s properties. (Video courtesy of Lori Sanders/Harvard University)
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Reconfigurable Materials
    Metamaterials — materials whose function is determined by structure, not composition — have been designed to bend light and sound, transform from soft to stiff, and even dampen seismic waves from earthquakes. But each of these functions requires a unique mechanical structure, making these materials great for specific tasks, but difficult to implement broadly. But what if a material could contain...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • A diamond radio receiver
    Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world’s smallest radio receiver – built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds. This tiny radio — whose building blocks are the size of two atoms — can withstand extremely harsh environments and is biocompatible, meaning it could work anywhere from a probe on Venus to a pacema...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

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  • The Great Molasses Flood
    Harvard students Grace Kossia, Rosa Bonilla, and Emily Woolway explain how viscosity played a role in the deadly "Great Molasses Flood" that occurred in Boston in 1919. The students produced this video for the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123), taught by Shmuel M. Rubinstein, Assistant Profes...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Students making molten chocolate cake
    Students Caroline Murphy, A.B. ’17, a music concentrator, and Catherine Curtin, A.B. ’17, a statistics concentrator, make molten chocolate cake during a lab session of "Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter."
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • Cyborg ray: Light-guided robotic stingray powered by heart cells
    A light-guided bioengineered ray created by the Disease Biophysics Group at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science, led by Professor Kevin Kit Parker. This work paves the way for the development of cyborg systems such as artificial organs as well as living biological robots.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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  • 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip with integrated sensors
    Harvard University researchers have made the first entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing. Built by a fully automated, digital manufacturing procedure, the 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip can be quickly fabricated and customized, allowing researchers to easily collect reliable data for short-term and long-term studies.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Drill Splashing Dynamics
    See how different fluids behave when they are spun on a drill bit. This messy and mesmerizing video was produced by students Dallas Schray, Kai Brannon, and Paul Kaczor for their project in "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

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  • Why Harvard SEAS?
    The 2015/2016 new Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences faculty reflect on what drew them to our school.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Dam Failure
    A dam can fail when the pore pressure at the base is increased so the ground behaves like a fluid. Why would this devastating problem occur? Students Lucas Cofer and Jessica Ewald explored this issue for their project in "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • A stem’s ‘sense of self’ contributes to plant shape
    It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there so many different plant shapes? Using simple mathematical ideas, researchers from the Harvard constructed a framework that explains and quantifies the different shapes of plant stems. Read the full story: https://www.seas.harvard.edu...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Buckling induced kirigami
    Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from the ancient Japanese paper craft of kirigami.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Ceramic Foam Print
    Direct foam writing of a hexagonal honeycomb with ceramic foam ink. After the ink solidifies, the resulting structure consists of air surrounded by ceramic on multiple length scales. The porosity of the structure at both micro and macro scales impacts the structure’s properties. (Video courtesy of Lori Sanders/Harvard University)
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Reconfigurable Materials
    Metamaterials — materials whose function is determined by structure, not composition — have been designed to bend light and sound, transform from soft to stiff, and even dampen seismic waves from earthquakes. But each of these functions requires a unique mechanical structure, making these materials great for specific tasks, but difficult to implement broadly. But what if a material could contain...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • A diamond radio receiver
    Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world’s smallest radio receiver – built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds. This tiny radio — whose building blocks are the size of two atoms — can withstand extremely harsh environments and is biocompatible, meaning it could work anywhere from a probe on Venus to a pacema...
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • The Great Molasses Flood
    Harvard students Grace Kossia, Rosa Bonilla, and Emily Woolway explain how viscosity played a role in the deadly "Great Molasses Flood" that occurred in Boston in 1919. The students produced this video for the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences course "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Students making molten chocolate cake
    Students Caroline Murphy, A.B. ’17, a music concentrator, and Catherine Curtin, A.B. ’17, a statistics concentrator, make molten chocolate cake during a lab session of "Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter."
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Cyborg ray: Light-guided robotic stingray powered by heart cells
    A light-guided bioengineered ray created by the Disease Biophysics Group at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science, led by Professor Kevin Kit Parker. This work paves the way for the development of cyborg systems such as artificial organs as well as living biological robots.
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip with integrated sensors
    Harvard University researchers have made the first entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing. Built by a fully automated, digital manufacturing procedure, the 3D-printed heart-on-a-chip can be quickly fabricated and customized, allowing researchers to easily collect reliable data for short-term and long-term studies.
  • Wrist Assistive Glove Co-Developed by Cassie Lowell, S.B. '17
    Cassie Lowell, a biomedical engineering concentrator at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, worked at Hiroshima University this summer, co-developing a glove that uses pneumatic actuators to assist wrist motions.
  • SEAS Graduate Admissions- Information for Applicants
    I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
  • Drill Splashing Dynamics
    See how different fluids behave when they are spun on a drill bit. This messy and mesmerizing video was produced by students Dallas Schray, Kai Brannon, and Paul Kaczor for their project in "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
  • Why Harvard SEAS?
    The 2015/2016 new Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences faculty reflect on what drew them to our school.
  • Dam Failure
    A dam can fail when the pore pressure at the base is increased so the ground behaves like a fluid. Why would this devastating problem occur? Students Lucas Cofer and Jessica Ewald explored this issue for their project in "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
  • Rotating Flow and The Rossby Number
    Students Kausalya Mahadevan and Charlie Alver explain what the Rossby Number can tell us about tornadoes and Earth's atmosphere. They produced this video for the course "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
  • 'Glugging' explained
    What factors influence how fast and how smooth liquid pours from a bottle? Students Ron Laracuente, Yuki Koide, and Kevin Shani explored the 'glugging' phenomenon in the course "Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes" (ES 123).
  • Piggybacking Robots: Overtrust in Human-robot Security Dynamics
    For her senior thesis, computer science concentrator Serena Booth examined the problem of over-trusting robotic systems.
  • Fly on the wall: Using static electricity, RoboBees can land and stick to surfaces
    The RoboBee, pioneered at the Harvard Microrobotics Lab, uses an electrode patch and a foam mount that absorbs shock. The entire mechanism weighs 13.4 mg, bringing the total weight of the robot to about 100mg — similar to the weight of a real bee. The robot takes off and flies normally. When the electrode patch is supplied with a charge, it can stick to almost any surface, from glass to wood to a ...
  • Better fuel cells through quantum materials
    Fuel cells, which generate electricity from chemical reactions without harmful emissions, have the potential to power everything from cars to portable electronics, and could be cleaner and more efficient than combustion engines. Solid oxide fuel cells, which rely on low- cost ceramic materials, are among the most efficient and promising type of fuel cell. Now, researchers from the Harvard John A....
  • Harvard SEAS Design & Project Fair Timelapse 2016
    The 2016 Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Design and Project Fair showcasing student work from the 2015-2016 academic year.
  • Engineering Sciences 100 Course Overview
    Woodward (Woody) Yang, Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, describes the undergraduate capstone class, Engineering Sciences 100.
  • A 3-D Material that Folds, Bends and Shrinks on its Own
    Harvard researchers have designed a new type of foldable material that is versatile, tunable and self actuated. It can change size, volume and shape; it can fold flat to withstand the weight of an elephant without breaking, and pop right back up to prepare for the next task.
  • Demba Ba: Computational Neuroscience, Signal Processing, and Network Science
    Demba Ba, Harvard SEAS Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering, describes his research interests at the intersection of theory, computing, data, and neuroscience.

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