J. Paul Getty Trust

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • Nazi Art Looting in Holland

    The J. Paul Getty Museum recently announced the acquisition of a first-century carved gem that was transferred by forced sale to Adolf Hitler’s planned art museum in Linz, Germany, and later restituted to the family of its original owners. Thinking about this wartime sale, I recalled a recent discovery in the records of the G. Cramer Oude Kunst gallery at the Getty Research Institute, one that she...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • Wikipedia Is Now a Reference Librarian’s Job

    The Getty Research Institute recently held its fourth Wikipedia edit-a-thon. The event was organized in collaboration with the Art+Feminism campaign, a collective of students, librarians, professors, artists, art workers, and art lovers who seek to increase the body of knowledge available on Wikipedia about women’s contributions to the arts. Previous Getty edit-a-thons have focused on Los Angeles...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • In Support of Research Libraries

    Recently I joined with fellow directors of research libraries across the United States to express support for the important work libraries do and to voice our concern over potential funding cuts in the federal budget. I share here the letter in full, and reiterate our support. Letter in Support of the NEH, IMLS and NHPRC from the Directors of Independent Research Libraries Independent research l...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • AUDIO: Nancy Perloff on Russian Futurist Book Art

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast Between 1910 and 1915, Russian painters and poets invented an experimental language called "zaum," which emphasizes sound and is characterized by indeterminacy in meaning. These artists used "zaum" to create handmade artists’ books that are meant to be read, seen, and heard. Nancy Perloff, author of "Explodity: Sound, Image, and Word in Russian Futurist Bo...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Borderless Wordplay of Concrete Poetry

    “Drink Coca-Cola!” Who hasn’t come across this slogan before? No matter what corner of the world you live in, these words have likely reached you. This was even true in the 1950s when Coca-Cola commercials first reached a global audience and were translated into as many languages as possible. The Brazilian poet Décio Pignatari turned this phenomenon into art, using the Portuguese version of the sl...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Hand of Louis XV

    Edme Bouchardon’s last masterpiece, a thirty-nine-feet tall Equestrian Monument to Louis XV, once stood in the middle of Place Louis XV—present-day Place de la Concorde—in Paris. Despite taking several years to create, an epic process that I detailed in a recent post, the bronze sculpture remained in place for less than three decades. Following the insurrection of August 10, 1792, Parisians topple...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Netherlandish Altarpiece Reassembled after Conservation Study

    The long-separated components of a remarkable triptych (about 1480–85) from the early career of the Netherlandish painter Gerard David have been reassembled following 18 months of technical study and conservation treatment of the wings at the Getty. The side panels, from the Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerp, have been reunited with the central scene, Christ Nailed to the Cross, gen...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Conservation Training Course Blends Online Learning, Intensive Workshop, and Distance Mentoring

    As my colleague Foekje Boersma wrote here on the Iris last week, recent and ongoing debate about appropriate climates for collections has eroded the certainty of prescriptive approaches to reveal that no one solution can be applied universally. As a member of the Managing Collections Environments initiative team and as course leader, I have been working with colleagues and instructors to develop ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • AUDIO: Kenneth Breisch on the Los Angeles Central Library

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast The Central Library in downtown Los Angeles is an iconic architectural landmark with high open ceilings, remarkable murals, and a striking façade. Kenneth Breisch, author of "The Los Angeles Central Library: Building an Architectural Icon, 1872–1933," discusses the extensive development of the library over the course of several decades, from its founding a...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Pictures of the People: Edme Bouchardon’s “Cries of Paris”

    One of the highlights of the exhibition Bouchardon, Royal Artist of the Enlightenment, on view at the Getty Center until April 2, is an extraordinary series of drawings and prints depicting street peddlers who populated Paris in the eighteenth-century. A leading French sculptor and draftsman of the time, Bouchardon depicted his models, close-up and at full length, wearing the garb and holding the ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Ninth-Century Qur’an Studied in Depth

    David Simonowitz, a scholar of Islamic art and professor of Middle East Studies at Pepperdine University, has been visiting the Getty Museum for the last few months to study a ninth-century Qur’an made in North Africa, likely Tunisia, in the late 800s A.D. His analysis of the script, vowel and consonant markings, and decorative features of the gilded lettering has shed light on elements that have ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Epic Creation of a Last Masterpiece

    Edme Bouchardon’s last masterpiece was one of the most prestigious and challenging commissions a sculptor could ever dream of: an equestrian monument. In 1748, the aldermen of Paris resolved to erect a statue in honor of King Louis XV in the Place Louis XV—the present-day Place de la Concorde—and entrusted Bouchardon to realize it. The resulting sculpture represented the king on horseback wearing ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • What Is Concrete Poetry?

    What is concrete poetry? Concrete poems are objects composed of words, letters, colors, and typefaces, in which graphic space plays a central role in both design and meaning. Concrete poets experimented boldly with language, incorporating visual, verbal, kinetic, and sonic elements. While it is important to note that there is no single definition of concrete poetry, the concrete poems that emerge...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Symposium Presents New Research on the Medieval Bestiary

    On March 3 and 4, UCLA’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Manuscripts Department hosted scholars from across the United States and abroad for an interdisciplinary symposium, “The Ark After Noah: Books, Beasts, and Bodies of Knowledge.” Generous support was provided by the Endowment for the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies and Brian and Kather...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Creating Sustainable Strategies for Managing Collection Environments

    Those responsible for the care of cultural heritage collections are always aware of the impact of the physical and ambient environments on collections’ long-term preservation. Materials susceptible to moisture such as wood, paper and other hygroscopic materials will be affected by extreme and prolonged climatic conditions: high relative humidity (RH) results in swelling of the material and may cau...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Songs of Stone

    Orpheus, the divining poet of stone, has always made me feel a profound nostalgia for a mythical ancient age of art and poetry. Nostalgia for an age when poets could really sing; an age when youths, bards—destined to decline into rhapsodes and finally into the scribblers we writers have become—used the living word with a divine voice. After this age there was no more psalmonising, no more presenti...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Scholarly Workshop Addresses Questions about the Mutual Influences between Egypt, Greece, and Rome

    The differentness of ancient Egypt, Herodotus’s “alien land full of wonders,” was the theme of a recent scholarly workshop at the Getty Villa bringing together Getty curators and visiting scholars who are pursuing research on cultural and artistic exchange among ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. What made ancient Egypt so different? Protected by water and desert on all four sides and shielded from...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Planting for Power in Ancient Rome

    Celebrations of great military victories in ancient Rome could be an ostentatious affair: triumphing generals entered the city in pomp, followed by prisoners of war, the precious objects from the booty heaped on wagons, and painted tableaux showing key stages of the military campaigns; this procession was often followed by feasting and public spectacles. But it may come as a surprise that in this ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Allan Sekula’s Papers Reveal His Art, Writing, and Thought Process

    Allan Sekula was an artist and theorist ahead of his time. When globalization was still a little-understood phenomenon, he recognized the enormity of its changes—from maritime transformations to labor conditions—and brought them to light in socially and critically engaged work. The Getty Research Institute has just acquired Sekula’s papers, which document the career of the artist, writer, and tea...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Rediscovery of Guercino

    Sir Denis Mahon (1910–2011) is undoubtedly one of the greatest art historian-collectors of the twentieth century. He was a key figure who, starting in the 1930s, brought Italian baroque painters back to the attention of English-speaking audiences, reversing the critical aversion to seicento art that had prevailed since the previous century. Born in London into a wealthy Anglo-Irish family, Mahon ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Middle East through a Victorian Woman’s Pen

    In 1858, Emily Anne Beaufort decided to leave her native London to visit the city of Palmyra and other sites in the Middle East. Her interest in travel was sparked by her father Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort, who had journeyed widely in his career as a naval officer and a specialist in hydrography. A year after his death, Emily Anne and her sister traveled to Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, western Turkey, ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Studying Sculpture by Learning How to Draw It

    The drawings exhibition The Sculptural Line was timed to coincide with Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment, a large international exhibition that has brought to life the work of one of the most accomplished sculptors of eighteenth-century France. Besides his activity as a sculptor, Bouchardon was also an incredibly prolific draftsman whose creative act often began on paper, working out i...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • AUDIO: Anne Woollett on “Rembrandt Laughing”

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast In 2007 an English family decided to sell a small painting in their collection: an image of a man laughing with a label featuring the name Rembrandt. The work was initially attributed to a contemporary of Rembrandt, but scholarly analysis and scientific testing determined that it was indeed a Rembrandt. We visit the painting in the Getty Museum’s galleries...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • 2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at the Getty Research Institute

    Art+Feminism is an international campaign to improve coverage of feminism and the arts in Wikipedia. In a 2011 survey, Wikimedia found that less than 13% of its contributors are female. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect is not: content is skewed by the lack of female participation. Art+Feminism invites people of all gender identities and expressions to ad...

  • Thinking about Sisyphus (Or, the Afterlife with Some Rock ‘n’ Roll)

    At the bottom left of the Underworld scene on the monumental krater that’s currently on loan from the National Archaeological Museum of Naples for conservation treatment, poor Sisyphus is consigned to pushing a rock up a hill, only for it to forever fall down again. It’s a huge thing, and Sisyphus needs all of his strength to force it upwards. He’s not helped, either, by a fierce creature named An...

  • @GettyHub Twitter Offers News for Researchers and Practitioners in Conservation, Art History, and Cultural Heritage

    Calling all Twitter users who work in heritage conservation, humanities research, or digital art history: find us at @GettyHub. This morning the account formerly known as @TheGetty became the new @GettyHub, where we’ll focus on news and resources of interest to the conservation and scholarly communities: new technology tools, collections and exhibitions research, grant and training opportunities,...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 month ago

New blog articles detected

  • Crossing the Line: The “Disgusting” Female Body as Artistic Medium of Resistance

    The recent U.S. election season, with its heated accusations, allegations, and statements, forces us to reconsider many things, but above all the place, treatment, and regard of women. We were reminded that, in our society, women are still widely regarded and represented as passive objects for pleasure, available for use or disposal. Take the Los Angeles Times of January 22nd, which devoted severa...

  • AUDIO: David Brafman on Alchemy

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast Now recognized as the ancestor of modern chemistry, alchemy is a mysterious and often misunderstood blend of science, philosophy, and spirituality. Alchemists were notorious for making artificial gold, but their impact extended far beyond their desire for noble metals. David Brafman, associate curator of rare books and curator of "The Art of Alchemy" at th...

  • New Sales Data Trace the First Hundred Years of the British Auction Market

    The Getty Provenance Index has, for three decades, been a leading resource for scholarship on the history of collecting. Founded in the early 1980s by Burton Fredericksen, the first curator of paintings for the Getty Museum, the Provenance Index has evolved into a collection of online databases with 1.75 million records indexing the works of art described in source documents such as auction catalo...

  • Funerary Portraiture Helps Scholars Reconstruct the Social History of Ancient Palmyra

    Archaeologist Rubina Raja is on a quest to find every ancient portrait from the city of Palmyra, Syria. Her Palmyra Portrait Project, founded in January 2012, is documenting all known Palmyrene funerary sculpture in a database that will be publicly accessible in the next two years. By assembling a corpus of this sculpture, the Project is enabling new discoveries about ancient Palmyrene society bas...

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