The Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBA) is a non-profit public aquarium located in Monterey, California, United States. The aquarium was founded in 1984 and is located on the site of a former sardine cannery on Cannery Row. It has an annual attendance of around two million visitors. It holds thousands of plants and animals, representing more than 600 species on display. The aquarium benefits from a high circulation of fresh ocean water which is obtained through pipes which pump it in continuously from Monterey Bay.

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Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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  • Deep-sea sponges with a killer appetite
    When most people think of sponges, they think of squishy, soap-filled kitchen sponges, or perhaps the graceful barrel sponges that grow around coral reefs. But in the dark depths of the ocean, some sponges have evolved into deadly predators, which trap and digest small, helpless prey. In a new paper in the journal Zootaxa, led by MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten, a team of scientists describe three...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Deep-sea sponges with a killer appetite
    When most people think of sponges, they think of squishy, soap-filled kitchen sponges, or perhaps the graceful barrel sponges that grow around coral reefs. But in the dark depths of the ocean, some sponges have evolved into deadly predators, which trap and digest small, helpless prey. In a new paper in the journal Zootaxa, led by MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten, a team of scientists describe three...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Using lasers to identify the composition of gas hydrates
    The Earth’s crust has weak points that allow gases to percolate upwards through the ground toward the seafloor. As gas makes its way toward the seafloor, it comes into contact with water. Under specific circumstances, namely low temperatures and high pressure, the gas and water combine to create gas hydrate. As hydrate forms, it expands, which can cause bulges in the seafloor. The gas that combine...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Diving murre at MBARI M1 mooring
    MBARI’s M1 mooring is an important data collection station that floats above the seafloor in Monterey Bay continuously taking a variety of oceanographic measurements. Below the surface from the diver’s perspective, it looks like a doughnut-shaped buoy tethered by a cable to an anchor at a depth of 1,100 meters (3,600 feet). Divers do regular maintenance on the mooring to clean algae and marine lif...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Whalefish, Cetomimus sp.
    Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) were surprised to come across this bright red whalefish (Cetomimus sp.) at 1,479 meters during a dive with the ROV Doc Ricketts in December 2016. The animal was 10.7 cm long. These may be the first living images of this species of Cetomimus.   Originally described as resembling baleen whales, female whalefishes are stout with larg...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • A sucker for jellyfish: The unexpected prey of the seven-arm octopus
    The seven-armed octopus, Haliphron atlanticus, has only been observed by MBARI’s remotely operated vehicles three times in 27 years. In this species, the male keeps the hectocotylized arm hidden so it appears to be missing, thus the common name. During the most recent encounter, the octopus was holding the bell of an egg-yolk jellyfish (Phacellophora camschatica) in its arms. The octopus had appar...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Maintenance of a shallow water Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)
    An MBARI Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) was deployed near San Diego as both an engineering test and a scientific experiment. Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography wanted to collect DNA samples over six months without the need for human intervention, a challenging engineering feat. After six months, once the ESP was recovered, the preserved samples were removed and subject to...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Deep sea physics: Water pressure and the incredible shrinking head
    To illustrate the effect of water pressure on air spaces in the deep sea, a styrofoam head was carried by a submarine, from the surface down into the ocean to 3,000 meters (9,840 feet). Water pressure increases with depth, compressing the tiny air pockets in the styrofoam, and causing the head to shrink. At a depth of 3,000 meters, the pressure is 300 times that on the surface, and presses about 4...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Laser Raman and gas hydrate
    The Earth’s crust has weak points that allow gases to percolate upwards through the ground toward the seafloor. As gas makes its way toward the seafloor, it comes into contact with water. Under specific circumstances, namely low temperatures and high pressure, the gas and water combine to create gas hydrate. As hydrate forms, it expands, which can cause bulges in the seafloor. The gas that combine...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Hydrothermal vent communities in the Gulf of California
    Two remarkably different hydrothermal vent fields discovered in the southern Gulf of California were recently described by a team of scientists. Despite being relatively close together, these vents host very different animal communities. This finding contradicts a common scientific assumption that neighboring hydrothermal vents will share similar animal communities. Instead, new research suggests ...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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  • Lava flow with bacteria
    White powder-like chemosynthetic bacterial mats cover this deep-sea lava flow. In sunlit areas of the ocean, organisms at the base of the food web can use photosynthesis to make food. But in the darkness of the deep sea, near underwater volcanoes, chemosynthesis reigns. Hot water (about 16.6° Celsius or 30° Fahrenheit hotter than the surrounding water) rich with chemicals and minerals is released ...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Baby octopus
    The ROV Doc Ricketts came across this juvenile Graneledone boreopacifica octopus crawling across the seafloor at a depth of 1,400 meters (over 4,900 feet) in Monterey Bay. This deep-sea baby is just a few inches long and, like others of this species, has warty skin and a single row of suckers along each arm. They primarily crawl around, but can also glide through the water by flapping their arms a...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Sur Ridge
    A variety of deep-sea sponges and bubblegum corals live on a rocky outcrop on Sur Ridge, a geographical feature located 32 kilometers southwest of Monterey Bay at a depth of 1,200 meters. Sur Ridge is about 11 miles long and 3 miles wide and is much smaller than the nearby Davidson Seamount. MBARI and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary first explored Sur Ridge in 2013. View an image galler...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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  • Tritonia sea slug
    Tritonia tetraquetra is a relatively large sea slug, or nudibranch, that can grow to 215 mm (8.5 inches) in length. Two horn-like structures on Tritonia's head are called rhinophores and allow the sea slug to "smell" chemical signals dissolved in sea water and help find its prey- deep-sea corals. It crawls onto corals and eats the soft polyps using its rasp-like tongue, called a radula. Two rows o...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Studying larvaceans using DeepPIV (Particle Image Velocimetry)
    Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) recently published a paper describing a new laser device called Deep Particle Image Velocimeter (DeepPIV). By mounting this instrument on a remotely operated vehicle (a type of underwater robot), scientists can measure the flow of seawater through the filters of giant larvaceans--tadpole-like marine animals that are important play...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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  • The giant larvacean Bathochordaeus
    Bathochordaeus is considered a giant among larvaceans. The giant larvacean’s claim to fame is the huge mucous house it builds. The house is made up of two filters and basically functions as an elaborate feeding apparatus. They eat tiny particles of dead or drifting plants and animals that float through the water column. The outer filter traps larger particles too big for the animal to eat, while t...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Pacific goosefish
    The Pacific goosefish, Lophiodes caulinaris, has a large, broad flattened body with a large mouth full of sharp, curved teeth. The goosefish has a modified dorsal spine on the top of its head that it uses like a fishing lure. It feeds by waiting on the sandy or muddy ocean floor, while attracting small fish and crustaceans with its lure. The Pacific goosefish can grow to 44.5 cm (17.5 inches) in ...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
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New YouTube videos detected.

  • Cryptic tonguefish
    Now you see it, and now you don't! Many fishes use camoflauge to hide from predators, but tonguefishes use crytpic coloration and a super-fast burial strategy to disappear quickly. This tonguefish (Symphurus sp.) is approximately 18 cm (7 inches) in length and was filmed in the Gulf of California.
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Diving murre at MBARI M1 mooring
    MBARI’s M1 mooring is an important data collection station that floats above the seafloor in Monterey Bay continuously taking a variety of oceanographic measurements. Below the surface from the diver’s perspective, it looks like a doughnut-shaped buoy tethered by a cable to an anchor at a depth of 1,100 meters (3,600 feet). Divers do regular maintenance on the mooring to clean algae and marine lif...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Whalefish, Cetomimus sp.
    Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) were surprised to come across this bright red whalefish (Cetomimus sp.) at 1,479 meters during a dive with the ROV Doc Ricketts in December 2016. The animal was 10.7 cm long. These may be the first living images of this species of Cetomimus.   Originally described as resembling baleen whales, female whalefishes are stout with larg...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • A sucker for jellyfish: The unexpected prey of the seven-arm octopus
    The seven-armed octopus, Haliphron atlanticus, has only been observed by MBARI’s remotely operated vehicles three times in 27 years. In this species, the male keeps the hectocotylized arm hidden so it appears to be missing, thus the common name. During the most recent encounter, the octopus was holding the bell of an egg-yolk jellyfish (Phacellophora camschatica) in its arms. The octopus had appar...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Maintenance of a shallow water Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)
    An MBARI Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) was deployed near San Diego as both an engineering test and a scientific experiment. Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography wanted to collect DNA samples over six months without the need for human intervention, a challenging engineering feat. After six months, once the ESP was recovered, the preserved samples were removed and subject to...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Deep sea physics: Water pressure and the incredible shrinking head
    To illustrate the effect of water pressure on air spaces in the deep sea, a styrofoam head was carried by a submarine, from the surface down into the ocean to 3,000 meters (9,840 feet). Water pressure increases with depth, compressing the tiny air pockets in the styrofoam, and causing the head to shrink. At a depth of 3,000 meters, the pressure is 300 times that on the surface, and presses about 4...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • The cockeyed squid Histioteuthis heteropsis
    Histioteuthis heteropsis, the strawberry squid, gets its common name from the berry-like appearance of its bright-red body speckled with numerous luminescent photophores. This animal is also called the cockeyed squid due to a remarkable eye dimorphism. The left eye of the adult squid can measure more than twice the diameter of the right eye, a curious trait not known in any other family of bilater...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Aristostomias scintillans
    Barbeled dragonfishes are a dominant group of predatory fishes that live mainly between 650 to 3,300 feet deep in the ocean’s mesopelagic zone, otherwise known as the twilight zone. Smithsonian scientist Dave Johnson says "The arsenal of specialized traits that barbeled dragonfishes have evolved as deep-sea predators—huge mouths with dagger-like teeth, distensible stomachs, snake like, black bodie...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Automating a 20-year survey of deep-sea animals
    A new robot that surveys the deep sea, collecting data autonomously, is providing a boost to one of MBARI’s longest running research projects. The Midwater Time-Series Project consists of remotely operated vehicle (ROV) video surveys of animals in the upper kilometer of the water column in Monterey Bay. Trained biologists review the video footage, identifying and documenting every animal seen. The...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • The pointy-nosed blue ratfish Hydrolagus trolli
    This video describes video observations of Hydrolagus cf trolli, the pointy-nosed blue ratfish, from the Northeast Pacific ocean. These observations represent a range extension for the species and are the first ever of this animal alive, in its own habitat. The species was first described from specimens collected off New Caledonia, in 2002. It was named in honor of Alaskan artist Ray Troll because...
Monterey Bay Aquarium
Monterey Bay Aquarium
YouTube Video

New YouTube videos detected.

  • Escaping predators: Finding refuge on a deep-living sea cucumber
    Juvenile crabs (Neolithoides diomedeae) sometimes settle on to the deep seafloor and have few options for a place to hide to escape predators. We recently observed that they frequently hide underneath another animal called a sea cucumber (Scotoplanes sp. A - a new species of holothurian) in this type of environment. Video producer: Linda Kuhnz Music: Slow Burn by Konstantinos Panagiotidis Original...
  • Eerie Critters of the Deep: Deep-Sea Nightmare
    For Halloween 2016, our Eerie Critters of the Deep series continues with a Deep-sea Nightmare starring the Black sea devil (Melanocetus), a Skeleton shrimp (a Caprellid amphipod), the Vampire Squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), a Bat-faced crab (Macroregonia macrochira), the Fangtooth (Anoplogaster cornuta), Giant sea spider (as big as your open fist, but not an actual spider; an arthropod called a...
  • Juvenile Luidia in midwater
    In June of 2015, MBARI biologists observed several unusual animals swimming in the upper water column at a depth of 40 m (120 ft). After some research they determined the animals were the larval form of the sea star Luidia. The juvenile and adult sea stars are common in Monterey Canyon at depths of about 75-225 m (225-675 ft). They can be seen moving rapidly across the muddy seafloor on their elon...

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