Stripe is a US technology company operating in over 25 countries that allows both private individuals and businesses to accept payments over the Internet. Stripe focuses on providing the technical, fraud prevention, and banking infrastructure required to operate on-line payment systems.

Wikipedia
Stripe
Stripe
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New page title detected.

  • New: Do you know anyone who makes you incredibly better at what you do? People who motivate and inspire you, complement your strengths and shore up your weaknesses, help you achieve things you could never do on your own? Maybe it’s your old co-founders, your college roommates, your collaborators on an open source project, or even your siblings; whoever it is, you’re stronger as a team than you are apart. Working together, each of you has a valuable advantage—you could call it a network effect—over anyone who works alone. Startup investors know this; that’s why firms like Y Combinator discourage solo applicants and focus so much on the makeup of a founding team. Stripe knows it too. Which is why we’d love you—that is, we’d love you and your collaborators—to apply together to work at Stripe. We call it Bring Your Own Team. Any group of 2 to 5 people can apply as a team to Stripe, through our application form. Make sure to include resumes or CVs for each person, indicate which role eac
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: As the internet’s global reach grows, Stripe users increasingly sell to worldwide audiences. Companies like DailyMotion in Paris, HubSpot in Boston, and Tito in Dublin build products that are popular everywhere, not just in their home markets. Starting today, businesses using Stripe in the US and Europe can accept payments in 139 currencies. You can create charges in any of these currencies, and we'll automatically handle converting and transferring funds to you in your home currency. Currency conversion incurs a 2% fee atop market exchange rates. With this change, you can easily tailor your pricing for different geographies. Localized pricing increases checkout completion rates by eliminating uncertainty for your customers and letting them avoid conversion fees. You don’t need to do anything to enable this in your account—you can simply start passing the currencies throughout the API: curl https://api.stripe.com/v1/charges \ -u sk_test_mkGsLqEW6SLnZa487HYfJVLf: \ -d amoun
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Since the 1960s, the U.S. has maintained a trade embargo with Cuba. Today, more than half a century later, many of these restrictions are gradually being lifted. At Stripe, we stand for increasing global commerce and enthusiastically support this action. The embargo has many components, among the most significant being the Office of Foreign Asset Control’s restrictions on access to financial services by Cuban nationals. On Tuesday, these were some of the first restrictions to be relaxed by the White House. This removes one of the biggest impediments to Cubans participating in the global financial system. It also removes one of the biggest barriers to entrepreneurship in Cuba. The restrictions on access to financial services have made it extremely tough for Cuban developers and founders to start new businesses or to work with U.S. investors or partners. Despite this, more than 70% of Cubans say that they’d like to start a business. In his upcoming historic trip—the first by a sit
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Since Stripe's earliest days, we've believed the world needs simpler and more open protocols for moving money. We launched our Bitcoin beta four months ago, and we recently published some of our thoughts around cryptocurrencies. Today, we're excited to see the launch of Stellar, a new open-source project and nonprofit organization to which we've provided seed funding. Stellar is (like Bitcoin) a decentralized payment network; unlike Bitcoin, it supports transactions in arbitrary currencies—you can use dollars, Euros, bitcoins, or anything else. Stellar implements something very close to the idealized "IP layer for money" idea that we described last week. You can find more details (and obtain your first "stellars", the network's native currency) by reading their launch post. Development is led by Jed McCaleb and Professor David Mazières in collaboration with a small team of others. (The technology is based on the open-source Ripple project, originally created by Jed a few ye
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: We’re open-sourcing Pagerbot, a tool we developed to make it easy to interact with PagerDuty through your internal chat system. (At the very least, we hope it'll help other companies respond to incidents like Shellshock or the ongoing AWS reboot cycle.) Background Like many tech companies, Stripe uses PagerDuty to help coordinate on-call schedules and incident response. The service is super reliable, does a great job of handling our normal rotations, and we appreciate being able to individually set preferences for how we want to get notified. Fairly frequently, though, people will trade on-call shifts, whether because of travel, vacation, or even just making sure someone is keeping an eye on things while they’re out watching a movie. The communication about the trades mainly happens in one of our Slack channels. Inspired by GitHub’s idea of chat-driven ops, we wanted PagerDuty schedule changes to happen in the same place as the rest of our
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: UPDATE: in December 2014 (about a year and half after this post), we blogged about our experiences scaling email transparency. A few months ago, Alex blogged about how we work at Stripe. In the post, he described how almost all of Stripe’s email is public inside the company. Since then, many people have asked about how this email openness actually works. Is it really the case all our mail is copied to a list? If so, how do we avoid drowning in email? This post is an attempt to describe a little more about why we do this and how we stay afloat. Background Initially, the motivation for having all email be internally public and searchable was simply to make us more efficient. If everyone automatically knew what was happening, we needed fewer meetings, and our coordination was more fluid and more painless if we could all keep up with the stream. As we’ve grown, the experiment has become about both efficiency and philosophy. We don’t just want Stripe to be a successful product a
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Even though there are many benefits, accepting ACH payments—that is, payments where you charge a bank account directly—has traditionally been pretty difficult. Doing so has generally involved baroque, legacy APIs. There’s additional complexity compared to credit cards because the transaction amounts are typically larger and authorization is subtler. Still, being able to handle ACH payments with Stripe has come up a lot as a feature request over the years. And so, today, we’re delighted to launch support for ACH payments for all U.S. Stripe users. Our ACH support is tightly integrated with the rest of Stripe. You can, of course, directly create one-off transactions and manage them within the Dashboard. You can also charge for subscriptions (as Slack or Digital Ocean do), while companies using Connect (like Fancy or Tilt) can accept ACH payments on behalf of their customers. No matter what sort of payments you’re dealing with, the reporting pipeline is fully unified with credit
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: As the internet’s global reach grows, Stripe users increasingly sell to worldwide audiences. Companies like DailyMotion in Paris, HubSpot in Boston, and Tito in Dublin build products that are popular everywhere, not just in their home markets. Starting today, businesses using Stripe in the US and Europe can accept payments in 139 currencies. You can create charges in any of these currencies, and we'll automatically handle converting and transferring funds to you in your home currency. Currency conversion incurs a 2% fee atop market exchange rates. With this change, you can easily tailor your pricing for different geographies. Localized pricing increases checkout completion rates by eliminating uncertainty for your customers and letting them avoid conversion fees. You don’t need to do anything to enable this in your account—you can simply start passing the currencies throughout the API: curl https://api.stripe.com/v1/charges \ -u sk_test_mkGsLqEW6SLnZa487HYfJVLf: \ -d amoun
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: We’re open-sourcing Pagerbot, a tool we developed to make it easy to interact with PagerDuty through your internal chat system. (At the very least, we hope it'll help other companies respond to incidents like Shellshock or the ongoing AWS reboot cycle.) Background Like many tech companies, Stripe uses PagerDuty to help coordinate on-call schedules and incident response. The service is super reliable, does a great job of handling our normal rotations, and we appreciate being able to individually set preferences for how we want to get notified. Fairly frequently, though, people will trade on-call shifts, whether because of travel, vacation, or even just making sure someone is keeping an eye on things while they’re out watching a movie. The communication about the trades mainly happens in one of our Slack channels. Inspired by GitHub’s idea of chat-driven ops, we wanted PagerDuty schedule changes to happen in the same place as the rest of our
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Update (Dec 22, 2016): The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council has extended its deadline for phasing out TLS 1.0. As a result, we are re-evaluating our deprecation schedule for SHA-1 based ciphers, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. Our SHA-1 signed certificate will still expire on December 29th. To keep your integration with Stripe secure, we plan to progressively phase out support for old technologies: SHA-1, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. (These protocols currently power the ‘Secure’ in ‘HTTPS’.) We’re sticklers for API backwards-compatibility and make potentially breaking changes only when absolutely necessary. Our users’ security is paramount, so deprecating these outdated technologies is one of those rare cases. We hope their flawed designs become footnotes in cryptographic history as quickly as possible. Why SHA-1, TLS 1.0 and 1.1 are insecure SHA-1 is one of the algorithms you can use to authenticate who you’re talking to. It’s now considered dangerously weak, and might allow a
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Today, mobile e-commerce websites aren’t working: Ten-step shopping carts, mandatory account signup, slow page loads. When we get linked to a shopping cart on our phone, we usually just give up. That shouldn’t be surprising—most mobile shopping sites are fundamentally the same as the desktop sites that preceded them, despite the medium calling for something completely different. The result has been predictable. Despite mobile devices representing 60% of browsing traffic for shopping sites, they only make up 15% of purchases. What does work? Native mobile apps, like Postmates or Instacart, with buying experiences designed to let the user transact as quickly as possible, reuse existing payment details across many orders, and finish the entire transaction in the same app they started in. Over the past year, a number of companies—Twitter, Pinterest, and Spring, to name a few—have worked to bring this kind of experience to e-commerce, pulling products from many stores into the very
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Update (Dec 22, 2016): The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council has extended its deadline for phasing out TLS 1.0. As a result, we are re-evaluating our deprecation schedule for SHA-1 based ciphers, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. Our SHA-1 signed certificate will still expire on December 29th. To keep your integration with Stripe secure, we plan to progressively phase out support for old technologies: SHA-1, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. (These protocols currently power the ‘Secure’ in ‘HTTPS’.) We’re sticklers for API backwards-compatibility and make potentially breaking changes only when absolutely necessary. Our users’ security is paramount, so deprecating these outdated technologies is one of those rare cases. We hope their flawed designs become footnotes in cryptographic history as quickly as possible. Why SHA-1, TLS 1.0 and 1.1 are insecure SHA-1 is one of the algorithms you can use to authenticate who you’re talking to. It’s now considered dangerously weak, and might allow a
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Even though there are many benefits, accepting ACH payments—that is, payments where you charge a bank account directly—has traditionally been pretty difficult. Doing so has generally involved baroque, legacy APIs. There’s additional complexity compared to credit cards because the transaction amounts are typically larger and authorization is subtler. Still, being able to handle ACH payments with Stripe has come up a lot as a feature request over the years. And so, today, we’re delighted to launch support for ACH payments for all U.S. Stripe users. Our ACH support is tightly integrated with the rest of Stripe. You can, of course, directly create one-off transactions and manage them within the Dashboard. You can also charge for subscriptions (as Slack or Digital Ocean do), while companies using Connect (like Fancy or Tilt) can accept ACH payments on behalf of their customers. No matter what sort of payments you’re dealing with, the reporting pipeline is fully unified with credit
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Today, mobile e-commerce websites aren’t working: Ten-step shopping carts, mandatory account signup, slow page loads. When we get linked to a shopping cart on our phone, we usually just give up. That shouldn’t be surprising—most mobile shopping sites are fundamentally the same as the desktop sites that preceded them, despite the medium calling for something completely different. The result has been predictable. Despite mobile devices representing 60% of browsing traffic for shopping sites, they only make up 15% of purchases. What does work? Native mobile apps, like Postmates or Instacart, with buying experiences designed to let the user transact as quickly as possible, reuse existing payment details across many orders, and finish the entire transaction in the same app they started in. Over the past year, a number of companies—Twitter, Pinterest, and Spring, to name a few—have worked to bring this kind of experience to e-commerce, pulling products from many stores into the very
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: We’re open-sourcing Pagerbot, a tool we developed to make it easy to interact with PagerDuty through your internal chat system. (At the very least, we hope it'll help other companies respond to incidents like Shellshock or the ongoing AWS reboot cycle.) Background Like many tech companies, Stripe uses PagerDuty to help coordinate on-call schedules and incident response. The service is super reliable, does a great job of handling our normal rotations, and we appreciate being able to individually set preferences for how we want to get notified. Fairly frequently, though, people will trade on-call shifts, whether because of travel, vacation, or even just making sure someone is keeping an eye on things while they’re out watching a movie. The communication about the trades mainly happens in one of our Slack channels. Inspired by GitHub’s idea of chat-driven ops, we wanted PagerDuty schedule changes to happen in the same place as the rest of our
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Since Stripe's earliest days, we've believed the world needs simpler and more open protocols for moving money. We launched our Bitcoin beta four months ago, and we recently published some of our thoughts around cryptocurrencies. Today, we're excited to see the launch of Stellar, a new open-source project and nonprofit organization to which we've provided seed funding. Stellar is (like Bitcoin) a decentralized payment network; unlike Bitcoin, it supports transactions in arbitrary currencies—you can use dollars, Euros, bitcoins, or anything else. Stellar implements something very close to the idealized "IP layer for money" idea that we described last week. You can find more details (and obtain your first "stellars", the network's native currency) by reading their launch post. Development is led by Jed McCaleb and Professor David Mazières in collaboration with a small team of others. (The technology is based on the open-source Ripple project, originally created by Jed a few ye
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: UPDATE: in December 2014 (about a year and half after this post), we blogged about our experiences scaling email transparency. A few months ago, Alex blogged about how we work at Stripe. In the post, he described how almost all of Stripe’s email is public inside the company. Since then, many people have asked about how this email openness actually works. Is it really the case all our mail is copied to a list? If so, how do we avoid drowning in email? This post is an attempt to describe a little more about why we do this and how we stay afloat. Background Initially, the motivation for having all email be internally public and searchable was simply to make us more efficient. If everyone automatically knew what was happening, we needed fewer meetings, and our coordination was more fluid and more painless if we could all keep up with the stream. As we’ve grown, the experiment has become about both efficiency and philosophy. We don’t just want Stripe to be a successful product a
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Since Stripe's earliest days, we've believed the world needs simpler and more open protocols for moving money. We launched our Bitcoin beta four months ago, and we recently published some of our thoughts around cryptocurrencies. Today, we're excited to see the launch of Stellar, a new open-source project and nonprofit organization to which we've provided seed funding. Stellar is (like Bitcoin) a decentralized payment network; unlike Bitcoin, it supports transactions in arbitrary currencies—you can use dollars, Euros, bitcoins, or anything else. Stellar implements something very close to the idealized "IP layer for money" idea that we described last week. You can find more details (and obtain your first "stellars", the network's native currency) by reading their launch post. Development is led by Jed McCaleb and Professor David Mazières in collaboration with a small team of others. (The technology is based on the open-source Ripple project, originally created by Jed a few ye
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Update (Dec 22, 2016): The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council has extended its deadline for phasing out TLS 1.0. As a result, we are re-evaluating our deprecation schedule for SHA-1 based ciphers, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. Our SHA-1 signed certificate will still expire on December 29th. To keep your integration with Stripe secure, we plan to progressively phase out support for old technologies: SHA-1, TLS 1.0, and TLS 1.1. (These protocols currently power the ‘Secure’ in ‘HTTPS’.) We’re sticklers for API backwards-compatibility and make potentially breaking changes only when absolutely necessary. Our users’ security is paramount, so deprecating these outdated technologies is one of those rare cases. We hope their flawed designs become footnotes in cryptographic history as quickly as possible. Why SHA-1, TLS 1.0 and 1.1 are insecure SHA-1 is one of the algorithms you can use to authenticate who you’re talking to. It’s now considered dangerously weak, and might allow a
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: As the internet’s global reach grows, Stripe users increasingly sell to worldwide audiences. Companies like DailyMotion in Paris, HubSpot in Boston, and Tito in Dublin build products that are popular everywhere, not just in their home markets. Starting today, businesses using Stripe in the US and Europe can accept payments in 139 currencies. You can create charges in any of these currencies, and we'll automatically handle converting and transferring funds to you in your home currency. Currency conversion incurs a 2% fee atop market exchange rates. With this change, you can easily tailor your pricing for different geographies. Localized pricing increases checkout completion rates by eliminating uncertainty for your customers and letting them avoid conversion fees. You don’t need to do anything to enable this in your account—you can simply start passing the currencies throughout the API: curl https://api.stripe.com/v1/charges \ -u sk_test_mkGsLqEW6SLnZa487HYfJVLf: \ -d amoun
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Building a business isn't a solo affair, and so today we’re launching support for inviting your whole team to Stripe. Now, everyone can have their own login credentials to a shared Stripe account. Since our launch, having multiple logins for your Stripe account has been one of our most requested features, and we're excited to finally make this available. In your account settings you'll find a new ">team settings tab. From here you can invite new users to your Stripe account, remove existing users, and even change your team members' permissions. That's right, your new users also come with their very own set of permissions. This means you can invite your support team without giving them access to your banking details, or your accountant without letting them refund your payments. There are three permission levels: Administrator gives you access to everything. You can see API keys, change settings, invite new users, etc. All existing Stripe users are now administrators
Stripe
Stripe
Page Metadata Update

New page title detected.

  • New: Do you know anyone who makes you incredibly better at what you do? People who motivate and inspire you, complement your strengths and shore up your weaknesses, help you achieve things you could never do on your own? Maybe it’s your old co-founders, your college roommates, your collaborators on an open source project, or even your siblings; whoever it is, you’re stronger as a team than you are apart. Working together, each of you has a valuable advantage—you could call it a network effect—over anyone who works alone. Startup investors know this; that’s why firms like Y Combinator discourage solo applicants and focus so much on the makeup of a founding team. Stripe knows it too. Which is why we’d love you—that is, we’d love you and your collaborators—to apply together to work at Stripe. We call it Bring Your Own Team. Any group of 2 to 5 people can apply as a team to Stripe, through our application form. Make sure to include resumes or CVs for each person, indicate which role eac

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